We interviewed Mayor Richard J. Berry to hear about his hopes and vision for The Integration Initiative work.

We are more than six months in to the second round of The Integration Initiative. Last April, five new sites joined the existing partners in their work to increase opportunities for low-income people. These new collective impact initiatives–located in Albuquerque, New Orleans, San Antonio, San Francisco and Seattle/King County–represented a portfolio expansion not only in size, but also into the southern and western regions of the U.S.

Living Cities and our partners learned a lot from the first round of the initiative, and have incorporated this learning into the second round. For example, we created a planning year where cross-sector leaders can spend time articulating their goals and gain alignment around a shared result. We have already seen the value in giving space to plan, and some sites have already refined their assumptions about their work before beginning to implement.

We still have a lot to learn about supporting collective impact initiatives in cities, and have committed to a developmental evaluation approach to refine what we are doing as we go.

With this commitment in mind, we asked the directors of our new site partners to share what they are learning as a part of TII. We share these lessons learned with you in the hopes they can help refine your approach to collective impact as well. We will be sharing reflections from all five sites, and today we feature an interview with Albuquerque Mayor Richard J. Berry about his city’s involvement in The Integration Initiative. He discusses his work listening to local enterpreneurs to improve government services, scaling up local initiatives and building partnership across the city.

Did what Mayor Berry say resonate with you? Share what you are learning about collective impact in the comments below.