While technology and the Internet have evolved rapidly over the last decade, our understanding of what it means to be a leader in this new, networked society has not kept pace.

In April of 2012, our CEO, Ben Hecht wrote in the Stanford Social Innovation review about a new way of leading in today’s hyperconnected world. He shared three ideas for changing how an organization communications in this new environment. Living Cities has embraced those ideas. This Throwback Thursday, we’re once again sharing Ben’s big ideas about ‘Leading in a Hyperconnected World’. They are still relevant to organizations and initiatives today.


With the rise of new digital media platforms and social networks, people are absorbing information at a greater velocity and from a wider set of channels than ever before; they are also using that information in new ways. Anyone with an Internet connection or cell phone can share their ideas, influence public opinion, or even spark a movement for change. Yet while technology and the Internet have evolved rapidly over the last decade, our understanding of what it means to be a leader in this new, networked society has not kept pace.

Leadership has become distributed and collaborative. The new reality is that leaders don’t lead alone. We are all part of a much broader problem-solving network, with many high-performing organizations and individuals—public and private—working on different parts of the same problem or even the same part of the same problem. The most influential members of the collaborative are increasingly harnessing new technology to share ideas, get real-time feedback, and build knowledge for the field. Leaders are no longer just steering their own ship; they are helping a network solve problems with the best and most current thinking available. Collaboration is the new competition and the more valuable your contributions are, the greater your influence will be.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE ON THE STANFORD SOCIAL INNOVATION REVIEW BLOG


Image credit: Flickr user Nana B. Ageyi via Creative Commons 2.0.