Too often, leaders attempt to apply programmatic, technical fixes to complex, interconnected systems level problems.

Individual projects and programs, however successful they are at helping the people who participate in them, are not enough to produce results at a scale approaching the scale of big problems such as failing and inequitable education, workforce and transit systems. We are working with leaders in cities to align resources, pass policies, and change systems to achieve dramatically better outcomes for low-income people.

Too often, leaders attempt to apply programmatic, technical fixes to complex, interconnected systems level problems. These problems are produces by the interacting policies and practices of all stakeholders. Thus, in order to move the needle on them, many actors and institutions must change their attitudes, priorities and behavior.

Only through this new type of civic infrastructure can we move away from piecemeal reforms and siloed systems and programs towards real, enduring change.

We believe that there is great promise in cross-sector leaders who have the power to influence how their institutions operate coming together to set a vision and big audacious goals, use data-driven methods to measure progress, and create transparent processes that engage grassroots partners and allow the public to hold them accountable.

Only through this new type of civic infrastructure can we move away from piecemeal reforms and siloed systems and programs towards real, enduring change.

We designed The Integration Initiative to support efforts in cities that are working at the vanguard of adaptive systems change work to improve the lives of low-income people.

Read more about what we learned about systems change through the first three years of The Integration Initiative.

We would love to hear from you about other promising systems change efforts!